Pub Crawl Part 1: the long, slow road to getting published

One of the reasons I resurrected this blog was to provide one writer’s experience of what it takes to get a book published.

I’ve made a living as a writer for well over a decade now.  Note that I said writer, not author.  Until very recently I had little interest in writing books.  For a long time, I made a name for myself as a copywriter with a large ad agency in New York.  The TV commercials and Websites and print ads I wrote were used to sell a wide range of products.  I’ve shilled for everything from pizza to financial products to pickup trucks to democracy.  I’ve also written magazine articles, done PR work for the medical marijuana lobby, and gotten paid for blogging.  This latter is a little like being a high-end hooker.  In the end, everyone involved feels ashamed, but it’s easy and you can always use those $100 bills to wipe away the tears.

Then, about a year ago, one of my clients — one of my respectable, perfectly legal clients — came to me with an unusual project.  Can you write a book, he asked?  Sure, I said.  I’d written everything else, so why not?  He agreed to take me on a credited co-author.  (For the time being, I’ve decided not to name either the client nor the book’s title nor even the general subject of the book.  It’s currently being shopped around to publishers and I don’t want to send so much as a breeze in the direction of that particular butterfly, lest its delicate course be altered.)

After a year of work, the manuscript is about a month away from completion.  I’ve found a high-profile agent who is, as I write this, casting about for interest from a publisher.

My goal for this blog is to report, in real time, what it takes to get a manuscript from completion to publication.  It’s possible, and even likely, the journey has already come to an end before it ever really started.  Then again, it’s possible this is the start of a really great ride.

I’ll let you know.

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